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Commentary: Spot the Future of Music

It is now feasible for music lovers everywhere to indulge in their wildest music dreams for the price of one compact disc at F.Y.E.

Relive the early nineties grunge movement through Nirvana’s entire back catalog. Next, Blaze through Rage Against The Machine’s most popular songs at a fingertip’s notice. At night, DJ at a party, all using a revolutionary, somewhat fresh new service named Spotify.

Spotify offers millions of songs for a mere $10 a month, combining unlimited streaming to the PC, tablet and mobile device.

With the wave of new car stereos coming equipped with USB ports, the combination makes for limitless driving and jamming.

Is this the future of music?

More importantly, can artists sustain themselves solely through services like Rdio, MOG and Spotify?

According to new data from the music industry, yes. A report from Bloomberg.com points out a noticeable increase in record sales, with at least some accreditation to these music streaming services.

But, not all record companies are buying in. Punknews.org reports that Sumerian records recently pulled their artists out of Spotify’s services.

And some artists, like Eminem, keep their hottest tracks restricted from mobile streaming. Search for Em’s duo with Dr. Dre, Guilty Conscience, and the track is inaccessible.

Circa the start of the century, album sales plummetted with the inception of file sharing and Napster

Used in the right vein, though, the Spotify business model could incite innovation in the industry.

Couple this with new distribution avenues like Tunecore and CD Baby setting up left and right to aid indie bands get their music into major digital music stores, and a Gladwellian Tipping Point may take place for the ailing industry.

What do you think the future of music consumption/distribution is? Tell us in the comments below.

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